REFLECTION POND BLOG TOUR

Hosted by YA BOUND BOOK TOURS. They’re awesome, guys, and I’m so excited for this tour. Not only is Reflection Pond featured on dozens of AMAZING blogs, it’s free.

YEP. You read that right, FREE STARTING TODAY. For Kindle, February 2-6. Tell everyone you know. Want to steal a gif and announce it on Facebook or Twitter? Here you go!

Reflection Pond Free Ad

Want a teaser quote?

Reflection Pond Quote 1

Below is the tour schedule. A HUGE THANKS to YA Bound for setting this up.

February 2:

Mom With A Kindle – Promo Post

Musings In Fiction Alley – Review

The YA Club – Promo Post

Once Upon A Time A Review – Promo Post

Fangirl World –  Review

Seeing Double In Neverland – Promo Post

February 3:

kariny’s teen boox frenzy – Review

The Page Unbound – Review

Mythical Books – Promo Post

Sunshine Book Promotions – Promo Post

The Perks of Being a Book Girl – Review

Just Us Book Blog – Promo Post

February 4:

Addicted Readers – Promo Post

Star-Crossed Book Blog – Review

The Written Adventure – Promo Post

Between The Lines – Review

Books and Ashes – Review

February 5:

Clever Girls Read – Review

Pandora’s Opened Box – Review

Curling Up With A Good Book – Promo Post

The Book Rogue – Review

Lovely Reads – Review

February 6:

The Avid Reader – Promo Post

Book Butterfly in Dreamland – Review

Reader Girls – Promo Post

CBY Book Club – Promo Post

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REFLECTION POND BLOG TOUR

Reflection Pond is going on tour with Irresistible Reads Tours. At the bottom you will find the tour schedule where you can get in on the action.

Reflection Pond for PrintPDF6_page1_image1Have you picked up your copy of Reflection Pond yet? Here’s what other people are saying –

“This book was definitely original.”

“I could not put this book down.

“I loved the chemistry between Callie and Rowan. It really came alive and I could just feel the sexual tension between the two.”

-Nikki

Full review HERE.

“The book offered everything. Romance, intrigue, murder, some minor violence.”

-Heather

Full review HERE.

“I loved this book!

“This is a story you don’t want to miss.”

-Iris

Full review HERE.

TOUR SCHEDULE

Monday, April 28:

Margay Leah Justice – Promotional Post

Tuesday, April 29:

Coffee Books & Art – Book Excerpt

Wednesday, April 30:

Endless Reading – Book Excerpt

Thursday, May 1:

Zili In The Sky – Guest Post

Friday, May 2:

Library Mosaic – Promotional Post

Monday, May 5:

The Phantom Paragrapher – Book Excerpt

Tuesday, May 6:

CJ Mckenzie @ Goodreads – Review

Wednesday, May 7:

Chelsea’s Reading Adventures – Review

Thursday, May 8:

Library Mosaic – Book Excerpt

Friday, May 9:

YA Bookaddict – Book Excerpt

Monday, May 12:

Readsalot – Book Excerpt

Tuesday, May 13:

Chelsea’s Reading Adventures – Book Excerpt

Wednesday, May 14:

Whispered Thoughts – Review

Literary Meandering – Interview

Thursday, May 15:

Paradise of Pages – Review

Kristy Centeno – Promotional Post

Friday, May 16:

Margay Leah Justice – Book Excerpt

Monday, May 19:

The Rest Is Still Unwritten – Promotional Post

Tuesday, May 20:

The Rest Is Still Unwritten – Review

Wednesday, May 21:

All Things YA and NA – Guest Post

Thursday, May 22:

Lekeisha The Booknerd – Review

Friday, May 23:

Monday, May 26:

Ladybug Literature – Book Excerpt

Tuesday, May 27:

Coffee Books & Art – Promotional Post

Wednesday, May 28:

Wrap-Up

SUCKER BLOG TOUR – DAY 31 – FEATURING MIMA TIPPER

ItSucker Literary Vol 2 Cover‘s the last day of the Sucker Literary Blog Tour and I have to say we’ve had a great run and shared some amazing author’s work. Did you miss the tour? Get all the dates and tour stops HERE.

IMPORTANT!! THIS IS TOMORROW!!! Sucker will reopen the doors for Volume 3 submissions. One day ONLY, August 1, 2013. Find the guidelines HERE.

Today we have a fantastic guest post from the lovely Mima Tipper.

“Boys and Reading and Bookstore Love”

 By Mima Tipper

 Truth be known, I’m more of a reader than a writer. Yup. I love writing because I love reading, and there’s nothing I like better than being pages deep in a fantastic novel. So imagine my readerly grief when my efforts to raise book-loving kids were pretty much a fail, especially in the case of my oldest son. Yeah, yeah, boys and reading, reading and boys: been there, done that, heard that, hate, hate, hate that. Exactly like many of his fellows, my oldest son loved being read to when he was little, liked books well enough through elementary school, but as soon as he hit middle school all that reading stuff went south. He had “better things to do.” Books were for “idiots.” Arrows through my reading-and-writing heart, people, big, sharp arrows!

Then came the summer after his freshman year of college. Two things: 1) my lovely, smart son was beginning to look at his future with a clearer, brighter eye; which led to 2) him being honest enough to confide that he wished he’d listened to me more about reading during his middle and high school days. That’s right. After one year at an uber-demanding liberal arts college, he saw how being a deeper, more fluent reader would’ve been a huge help with his crazy-hard courses.

Victory? No. Want to slap him silly with “I told you sos?” No (okay, maybe a little). In true mother-form, I told him it was never too late and I invited him to read a book with me. Yeah. We’d have a little mommy/son “summer book group.”

Carping the diem (and not wanting him to change his mind) I rushed him to our local independent bookstore, Phoenix Books. From the title of this piece, you might think I did that because I’m a bookstore purist: I am, mostly, but I do buy tons of stuff on-line (including the occasional book). This was not a time for internet shopping, though. Nope. I wanted books in our hands pronto, and going to an actual store was the only way that could happen. So yeah, I hustled him into the store, and bee-lined to novels by my fave authors. With barely a glance, my son rejected all of my choices: “Too much like school-reading,” he said, “Too chick-ish, too long, sounds boring…” and on and on.

Hmmm.

We began moving through the shelves, letting our fingers trail over book spines, angling our heads to read titles, and generally letting the texture, smell, and feel of being surrounded by books wash over us. Here and there I’d pull a book off the shelf, and we’d read the first page together, heads close. An admitted book-slut, more often than not I’d be sucked in, wanting immediately to shack up with Chapter One. Not so for my son. Picky, picky, he’d take the book from my hand, and put it back on the shelf. I chose not to advocate or argue for my choices, because I was on a mission: the book we chose had to be that perfect book, the one that would rope my son like a rogue calf, and tie him at last and forever to the reading-for-life fold. (Did I mention that I’m delusional? I do write fiction after all!)

Little by little, I began to notice something beyond my book-shopping fever: how being in the physical bookstore, especially a smaller, more eclectic independent, was working magic on my son. Displays of different books were closer together: the fiction section only a couple of feet from local interest books, novelty books, picture books, cook books. He browsed away and, as I continued searching the racks, sometimes chatting with a bookseller, I’d come across him curled up in a chair, reading humor, or standing by a table poking through a book of photographs. Magic upon magic, pearls began dripping from his tongue: “Check this out, Mom.” “Have you seen this one?” “My friends were reading this, take a look.” “Oh,” I’d murmur, not wanting to burst the bubble and, one by one, I collected each pearl.

Me? I loved bookstores from the get-go, but that day I experienced the space through my son’s eyes: how being in the physical store relaxed him, let him wander and dream. This wonderful experience with my son was illustrating for me in a new way that internet-shopping ( or even whatever kind of shopping comes next) will never replace the magic of certain kinds of physical-shopping, like being in a bookstore. Surrounded by hardcovers and softcovers, sizes, shapes, colors and textures, my son and I could push the envelope of what kind of book we “wanted” or were “searching for,” and instead actually “discover.”

Eventually we agreed on a book: J. Lethem’s first novel, Guns with Occasional Music, a short, wacky, Raymond-Chandler-meets-William-Gibson sci-fi-noir-crime thriller. We both liked the book a lot, and later that summer had a lovely bit of fun talking about it. Now, I can’t claim that our book and bookstore experience converted my son to crazy-avid-readerness, but he does spend more time reading for pleasure these days, and when we get the chance, it is mad-fun going to a bookstore together.

A small P. S: I guess my hope is that stories like this one will add fuel to the fire for all of us (internet book sources/retailers, as well) to work together actively to support the survival of bookstores. After all, if kids don’t grow up spending time in actual physical book places (that means you too, libraries) will they even bother searching out books on the internet, or anywhere else?

About the Author: Mima Tipper received her MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and is thrilled not only that her short story “Waiting for Alice” will appear in Sucker Literary Magazine’s first issue, but also that another of her YA stories, “A Cut-Out Face”, was in the fall, 2011 issue of Hunger Mountain’s online Journal of the Arts. When she’s not whipping up trouble for her fictional characters, Mima tries to take full advantage of living with her family in her beautiful home state of Vermont. Find her on Twitter @meemtip. She is represented by Hen&ink Literary Studio.

Pick up a copy of Sucker Literary Volume 2 Today! Amazon

When Alex’s bandmates invite a girl to sing lead, a battle of the sexes becomes a battle over something unexpected. . . A girl tells her friend about hooking up with longtime crush Fred, but his kisses are not what makes that night in his car memorable. . . A therapy session with Doug might just make Jason go insane again. . . Wallflower Aubrey hooks up with Gordon after the cast party, which would be fine if he weren’t the most forbidden fruit of them all…Savannah certainly doesn’t sound like a convict’s name, so maybe hanging out with her isn’t all that dangerous. Miki is committed to getting over Dex, yet she can’t get him off her answering machine—or her doorstep. In between puffs of cigarettes and attempts to smear lipstick on her face, Allie’s grandmother dishes out advice that maybe Allie should take. . . And finally, what’s a girl to do with Satan as both her boss and father? Nine short stories pose the questions we obsess over whether we’re growing up or all grown up: Who should I love? Am I doing the right thing? Is there ever an end to heartbreak? In its second volume, SUCKER continues to showcase the very best emerging talent in young adult literature and give (some of) the answers to Life’s Big Questions along the way.

IMPORTANT!! THIS IS TOMORROW!!! Sucker will reopen the doors for Volume 3 submissions. One day ONLY, August 1, 2013. Find the guidelines HERE.

Sucker Literary

Facebook

Goodreads

SUCKER BLOG TOUR – DAY 1 – INTERVIEW WITH HANNAH GOODMAN

If you haven’t heard by now, I’m working for the fabulous Sucker Literary. My very first project? THIS BLOG TOUR!

logomark_color_web_medWelcome to the very first Sucker Blog Tour – I’m so excited to bring you an interview with Founder/Editor Hannah Goodman. Let me tell you from working with this woman – she is a force to be reckoned with! She is taking the Young Adult Genre by storm and letting fledgling authors have their say in a very tight, and often unforgiving, market.

You started Sucker after searching the market and finding it lacking in YA. How is Sucker different from what’s out there?

Sucker Literary is the only literary anthology that focuses on YA short fiction ONLY. It is also the only literary anthology out there that includes images with stories. Sucker Literary is the only literary enterprise comprised of an all volunteer staff, including marketing and website design and development and has a staff who functions in multiple capacities including writing. From the quality of the writing and the publication to the way we function as a staff, there really isn’t anything out there like us

Ideally, where is Sucker five years from now?

An entity in the publishing world that is larger than just a publication.

Sucker has a mentor process for submissions. How does this work?

I field the submissions to our readers. Then our staff of 25 plus readers must fill out feedback sheets, which include whether or not a piece should be accepted, rejected, or mentored. Then they send those back to me, and I read EVERY SINGLE one. How long does that take? Depends on the 900 other things I have to do. But I always make time for Sucker!

I have a day job, my own writing, and a family with two kids under ten. SUCKER LITERARY is my labor of love, but in order for it to happen and to happen in the best way possible, each part of the process takes a lot of time : )

Decisions about accepting and mentoring come from initial recommendations (on the feedback sheets) from readers, but ultimately the piece must resonate with me. This part of the process also takes some time and cannot be rushed because I want to publish the VERY best work from emerging writers of short form YA fiction.

Once final decisions are made regarding pieces, notes and feedback sheets are given to the folks we have agreed to mentor or accept. And they, like all of us on staff, have lives filled with many other responsibilities. I do not like to rush their process of revising. So that part of the process can take more weeks or months. Revising can also take a round or two and so add a few more weeks or months onto that. Once revisions are completed, well, that’s a whole other timeline and blog entry!

The folks we agree to mentor are given 1-2 rounds of notes and revisions. Sometimes a piece doesn’t come together in these 1-2 rounds. Those folks sometimes are invited to resubmit with further revisions for the next reading period. But other times, it’s time to part ways. Rejecting those folks is very hard. Sometimes they do submit again, and they still haven’t gotten the piece where it needs to be. My least favorite thing to do is tell them no. . . again. But I provide reasons why and also encouragement to keep going because sometimes it’s just not a perfect fit and they can go elsewhere and find a home for the piece.

I’m a teacher by trade. Our writers, even those whose pieces we accept, go through revisions. The difference between a piece that’s accepted for publication and a piece that makes it to the mentoring round but not to publication has to do with foundation of the story. If a story has plot holes or under developed characters after 2 rounds of revisions, then it’s not ready to be published. 

Sucker seems like a “brand name,” what kinds of stories fit the Sucker brand?

Edgy, sassy, humorous, intelligent, bold, colorful, thought provoking, engaging.

Perks of Being a Wallflower is a good example of contemporary fiction that we like. Feed by M.T. Anderson for the dystopian genre. Carolyn Mackler’s novels are the kinds of romances we like. But don’t think that’s all. I am pretty open to anything. Just take a look at our first two volumes. 

As the editor, what is the most challenging part of publishing Sucker?

My day job! Translated: TIME

Publishing is a lot of “who you know,” who’s on Sucker’s Most Wanted list?  (Who do you want to notice Sucker?)

Carolyn Mackler

John Green

Stephen Chbosky

Erica Lorraine Scheidt

Just to name a few.

What advice can you give rejected writers?

It’s cliché but true: don’t give up. Also, each rejection brings you a step closer to the right fit in terms of agent or publisher.

How does the upcoming Sucker Volume Three differ from Volume Two?

I’ll tell you when I finish making decisions about submissions. So far, it’s pushing the edge a little bit more than volume 2.

Open Door Day is coming up, what’s that all about?

24 hours of opening the “doors” to submissions for volume 3. No mentoring and no feedback. Send your very very best.

Running a literary magazine is hard work, what keeps you coming back for more?

Insanity. An electric impulse to create and make things grow.

Include anything else you want-

I love you, Kacey!!!!! And my entire staff and all supporters!!!!! (She really said that! I swear!)

Hannah Big LolliHannah Goodman is a YA author represented by Erzsi Deàk of Hen&ink Literary Studio. Her YA novels have won awards and garnered praise but her proudest endeavor is Sucker Literary. She owns The Write Touch, offering a variety of services for clients of all ages. Hannah is a member of SCBWI as well as a graduate of the Solstice MFA program at Pine Manor College. She resides in Bristol, RI with her husband, two daughters, and three cats: Lester, Maisey, and Judy. More about Hannah can be found on her website: hannahrgoodman.com

Now for Sucker Literary, Volume 2!

Sucker Literary Vol 2 Cover

When Alex’s bandmates invite a girl to sing lead, a battle of the sexes becomes a battle over something unexpected. . . A girl tells her friend about hooking up with longtime crush Fred, but his kisses are not what makes that night in his car memorable. . . A therapy session with Doug might just make Jason go insane again. . . Wallflower Aubrey hooks up with Gordon after the cast party, which would be fine if he weren’t the most forbidden fruit of them all…Savannah certainly doesn’t sound like a convict’s name, so maybe hanging out with her isn’t all that dangerous. Miki is committed to getting over Dex, yet she can’t get him off her answering machine—or her doorstep. In between puffs of cigarettes and attempts to smear lipstick on her face, Allie’s grandmother dishes out advice that maybe Allie should take. . . And finally, what’s a girl to do with Satan as both her boss and father? Nine short stories pose the questions we obsess over whether we’re growing up or all grown up: Who should I love? Am I doing the right thing? Is there ever an end to heartbreak? In its second volume, SUCKER continues to showcase the very best emerging talent in young adult literature and give (some of) the answers to Life’s Big Questions along the way.

Sounds great, right? Because it IS!

Get Sucker in all these places:

Amazon

Sucker Literary

Facebook

Goodreads

Sucker Free Day is July 20th and 21st. Get a FREE digital copy of Sucker Literary Volume 2 on Amazon.

Sucker is looking for more short stories for Volume 3. Get the details for Open Door Day (August 1, 2013): HERE.

Don’t be a Sucker, follow our tour:

July 1stKacey Vanderkarr

Featuring Sucker founder:

Hannah Goodman

July 3rdStephanie Keyes

Featuring Sucker author:

Ann Karasinski

July 5thLisa Voisin

Featuring Sucker author: Paul Heinz

and an excerpt from Sucker

Literary Volume 2

July 7thVincent Morrone

July 8thBook Reviews by Dee

Featuring an interview with Sucker author: Claudia Classon

July 9thWrite All the Words

Featuring Sucker author:

Josh Prokopy

July 10thLiving Fictitiously

Featuring an interview with Sucker author: Suzanne Kamata

and an excerpt and giveaway of Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 12thTanya’s Book Nook

Featuring an excerpt, giveaway, and review of Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 14Catrina Beeny

Featuring Sucker author:

Kelly Samuels and an excerpt from Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 15thThree Book Reviewers

Featuring an excerpt from

Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 18thLiving a Fictional Reality

Featuring a review of Sucker

Literary Volume 2

July 20thBrooke Blogs

Featuring a review of Sucker

Literary Volume 2

July 21stPage Flipperz YA

July 24thCellar Door Books

Featuring Sucker author:

Aida Zilelian and a review of Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 26thMartha Allard

Featuring Sucker author: Candi Fite

July 29thWe Do Write

Featuring an excerpt from

 Sucker Literary Volume 2

July 30thJustine Manzano

Featuring Sucker founder: Hannah Goodman and Sucker Social Media Director: Kacey Vanderkarr

July 31stKacey Vanderkarr

Featuring Sucker author:

Mima Tipper

Thank you Hannah and Sucker. It feels great to be a part of something so wonderful.

All the best,

Kacey